One of the many unintended consequences of a free and open internet is the unbelievable amount of bad advice out there. When the litmus test for value boils down to clicks and streams, quantity (not quality) reigns supreme. This ecosystem encourages, even rewards, bad behavior. Personally, I loathe every “5 tips for ____” post or article that makes its way into my inbox or feed. More often than not, instead of providing practical wisdom or insight, these articles are unnecessarily disconcerting, provocative, or bombastic leaving the reader more afraid and confused than anything else. Or, they are so soft and fluffy that while the reader may enjoy thirty minutes of comfort or peace of mind, they rarely provide any discernible next steps.

For jobseekers trying to figure out which companies to apply to, which jobs to apply for, and how to write a compelling resume and cover letter there is no shortage of terrible advice available. A quick google search on resume writing will provide you with 10 bad articles and little that will actually help you secure a new opportunity.

With clients across industries, regions, and sectors, we have a front-row seat watching the gamut of interview processes and techniques unfold. Some of our clients prefer to lean into their gut. If they have a good feeling about a candidate they’ll make an offer at the conclusion of the first interview. Others take months to screen, interview, check references, and interview some more before making an offer. We have clients who bomb our candidates with assessments and others who will hire anyone with a pulse that passes a background check and drug test. To be sure, an effective interview process is largely dependent upon industry, urgency, and culture. If your competition is scooping talent up quickly you have no choice but to move fast. With low unemployment, good candidates will always have 2-3 offers to decide between. There’s no one right way to go about interviewing candidates, but there sure are a handful of broken processes.

So how do you know if your interview process is broken? Here are a few signs: