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On average, our team submits 40-50 candidates each month to our clients. Those numbers are distilled from the thousand or so candidates we vet and assess inside the same window. Every once in a while we’ll have a client, usually close to the finish line with a candidate, call and ask, “Did we check references on them?” Cue the eye roll. Of course, we are more than happy to hear from the filtered list of people about how great our candidate is. In truth, and I suspect everyone knows it, it is a colossal waste of time.

One of the many unintended consequences of a free and open internet is the unbelievable amount of bad advice out there. When the litmus test for value boils down to clicks and streams, quantity (not quality) reigns supreme. This ecosystem encourages, even rewards, bad behavior. Personally, I loathe every “5 tips for ____” post or article that makes its way into my inbox or feed. More often than not, instead of providing practical wisdom or insight, these articles are unnecessarily disconcerting, provocative, or bombastic leaving the reader more afraid and confused than anything else. Or, they are so soft and fluffy that while the reader may enjoy thirty minutes of comfort or peace of mind, they rarely provide any discernible next steps.

For jobseekers trying to figure out which companies to apply to, which jobs to apply for, and how to write a compelling resume and cover letter there is no shortage of terrible advice available. A quick google search on resume writing will provide you with 10 bad articles and little that will actually help you secure a new opportunity.